House in Wimbledon

 

New-build four-bedroom house for a private client, London

 

 

The practice has submitted a planning application for a custom build house in the Wimbledon North Conservation Area.

 

Located on a generously sized garden plot at the end of a cul-de-sac lined by detached houses, the proposed two-storey building replaces the clients' existing house. The existing house suffers from low ceilings and a poor connection with the surrounding green spaces and remains of a 17th century garden wall.

 

The proposed detached house responds to the rhythm, character and scale of the immediate urban context by subdividing the overall volume containing ground floor living spaces and bedrooms at first floor level into three smaller volumes with mono-pitched roofs. Low eaves lines and narrow gable ends are oriented towards the perimeter of the site.

 

Generously sized windows at ground floor level face in all directions towards the surrounding garden. A relocated double-height kitchen-dining space with skylight will become a central, light-filled hub for the family.

 

A restrained material palette sympathetic to the Conservation Area context has been proposed for the envelope, with light coloured water-struck clay bricks, matching lime mortar, clear finished hardwood timber windows and anthracite slates.

 

 

 

House in Wimbledon

 

New-build four-bedroom house for a private client, London

 

 

The practice has submitted a planning application for a custom build house in the Wimbledon North Conservation Area.

 

Located on a generously sized garden plot at the end of a cul-de-sac lined by detached houses, the proposed two-storey building replaces the clients' existing house. The existing house suffers from low ceilings and a poor connection with the surrounding green spaces and remains of a 17th century garden wall.

 

The proposed detached house responds to the rhythm, character and scale of the immediate urban context by subdividing the overall volume containing ground floor living spaces and bedrooms at first floor level into three smaller volumes with mono-pitched roofs. Low eaves lines and narrow gable ends are oriented towards the perimeter of the site.

 

Generously sized windows at ground floor level face in all directions towards the surrounding garden. A relocated double-height kitchen-dining space with skylight will become a central, light-filled hub for the family.

 

A restrained material palette sympathetic to the Conservation Area context has been proposed for the envelope, with light coloured water-struck clay bricks, matching lime mortar, clear finished hardwood timber windows and anthracite slates