House in Wimbledon

 

New-build four-bedroom house for a private client, London

 

 

Located on a generously sized plot at the end of a cul-de-sac in the Wimbledon North Conservation Area, this house replaces a two-storey cottage and garage from the 1930’s.

 

The building takes cue from its context adopting sloping roofs and a similar scale to the adjacent buildings, while the monopitched outlines and arrangement elude direct assimilation. Three volumes define the external appearance and the internal organisation.

 

Shared family routines of cooking and dining are enjoyed within the double height space on the more private northern side, facing the 17th century boundary wall of a former manor house. An open stair leads from this spacious room to the first floor bedrooms. A herb garden occupies the space between the house and the historic boundary wall, partly enclosed by the new and existing walls and shaded by the canopy of a mature ash tree.

 

The two-storey southern volume of the building is occupied by the living room on ground floor and a master suite on first floor. Large picture windows offer views across the living spaces and open out to the surrounding garden, while clerestorey windows and a brick screens serve to protect privacy in the master suite. An internal window allows for informal communication and a visual connection between the bedroom and the double height living space below.

 

Along the western boundary, the ancillary two-storey wing accommodates a study, gym and utility on ground floor and bedrooms with toplit en-suite bathrooms on first floor.

 

The building fabric adopts a sustainable, low energy design approach with a timber frame and high levels of thermal insulation. A ground source heat pump serves as the primary source of heating. The house is fitted with an MHRV system, providing filtered fresh air while recovering heat from the extract air to minimise heat loss in the winter.

 

The facade is constructed of flush pointed water-struck clay bricks and lime mortar, with hardwood timber windows and doors.

 

Planning approval has been granted and construction start is anticipated for February 2022.

 

 

House in Wimbledon

 

New-build four-bedroom house for a private client, London

 

 

Located on a generously sized plot at the end of a cul-de-sac in the Wimbledon North Conservation Area, this house replaces a two-storey cottage and garage from the 1930’s.

 

The building takes cue from its context adopting sloping roofs and a similar scale to the adjacent buildings, while the monopitched outlines and arrangement elude direct assimilation. Three volumes define the external appearance and the internal organisation.

 

Shared family routines of cooking and dining are enjoyed within the double height space on the more private northern side, facing the 17th century boundary wall of a former manor house. An open stair leads from this spacious room to the first floor bedrooms. A herb garden occupies the space between the house and the historic boundary wall, partly enclosed by the new and existing walls and shaded by the canopy of a mature ash tree.

 

The two-storey southern volume of the building is occupied by the living room on ground floor and a master suite on first floor. Large picture windows offer views across the living spaces and open out to the surrounding garden, while clerestorey windows and a brick screens serve to protect privacy in the master suite. An internal window allows for informal communication and a visual connection between the bedroom and the double height living space below.

 

Along the western boundary, the ancillary two-storey wing accommodates a study, gym and utility on ground floor and bedrooms with toplit en-suite bathrooms on first floor.

 

The building fabric adopts a sustainable, low energy design approach with a timber frame and high levels of thermal insulation. A ground source heat pump serves as the primary source of heating. The house is fitted with an MHRV system, providing filtered fresh air while recovering heat from the extract air to minimise heat loss in the winter.

 

The facade is constructed of flush pointed water-struck clay bricks and lime mortar, with hardwood timber windows and doors.

 

Planning approval has been granted and construction start is anticipated for February 2022.